Basic Marmalade Recipe

I cannot believe that I have not given you my basic marmalade recipe. For as long as I can remember I have seen someone in the family making marmalade each year when the fruit has been ripe on our trees. When we were in England I would buy Seville oranges until they went out of vogue and I was told that “no one wants them any more”!
Fruit:
Seville oranges, these are difficult to obtain.
Any oranges but know whether they are bitter or sweet.
Grapefruit.
Lemons.
Limes.
Tangerines or similar.
Lemonade fruit.
Pomanders.
Quince.
A mixture of two, three or four fruits
Proportions for every Lb 450 gms of fruit use:-
For bitter fruit to give a sweet marmalade:-
3 pints 1 3/4 Litres of water.
3 lbs 1 1/2 Kgs sugar
2 Tblsps lemon juice
For sweeter fruit or a less sweet marmalade:-
2 pints 1 1/4 litres water
2 lbs 900 gms sugar
lemon juice if required, it helps the set
My husband and I like a tangy marmalade and are conscious of our sugar intake so I half the quantity of sugar and usually reach setting point. When making the lemonade marmalade which is quite a bitter fruit I used 1 1/2 lbs 700 gms of sugar to 1 lb 450 gms of lemonade fruit.
Every 1 lb 450 gms sugar should produce about 1 2/3 lbs 800 gms of marmalade.
Method
Wash and halve the fruit. Squeeze out all the juice.
Remove the pips, pulp and pith and place in a muslin cloth or bag.
By hand or with a food processor shred the peel into thin or chunky slices according to taste.
In a preserving pan or very large saucepan put the required amount of water, peel and bag of pips. Simmer gentle until the peel is tender. About 11/2 -2 hours.
Add the sugar the orange juice and the lemon juice if it is in the recipe. If a ‘jam set’ is being used add it at this stage.
Note: once the sugar is added the peel will not get any softer, be sure lime peel is very soft.
Bring to the boil and boil rapidly. Watch the pan carefully as it will boil over in the blink of an eye!
Stir only occasionally at the beginning, to make sure the sugar is not sticking, as this lowers the temperature.
Use a sugar thermometer and setting point is reached when the temperature is at 220F, 100 C.
Take a little of the marmalade and place it on a clean saucer. Allow to cool and a wrinkled surface will appear when pushed with a finger.
Any marmalade left on the spoon will wrinkle and flake when cold.
When setting point is reached turn the heat off.
Stir the marmalade to distribute the peel evenly and allow to cool a little.
Wash clean the bottles and lids then heat in the oven to 100C, 200F, a cool oven, or use the dish washer.
Pour the marmalade into the hot jars either straight from the pan if you can lift it and control it or using a jug.
Fill the jars to within 1/2 cm 1/4 ins of the top. the less air space in the jar the less chance for mould to grow.
Place the waxed paper over the surface and seal with the lid.
Label.
Store in a cool dry place.
If the marmalade has not set when the jars are cold return to the pan and boil up again until setting point is reached. You may wish to add a jam set to the second boiling.
Clean and reheat the jars and lids.
A quantity of marmalade will have been lost in cleaning the jars and boiling off more fluid.
The second boiling always causes the marmalade to be darker in colour.

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